Thursday, April 28, 2016

LEICA ANNOUNCES M-D (TYP 262): DIGITAL M WITH ANALOG FEEL




Leica M-D

By Josh Lehrer 

Today, Leica Camera has announced the Leica M-D (Typ 262), a full-frame digital M rangefinder camera with no rear LCD screen, live view, video or electronic viewfinder compatibility. The camera features similar specifications to the M (Typ 240) with a finish in black paint, brass construction (same 690 gram weight as the M240), a 1GB buffer and 3 frames-per-second continuous shooting. However, it does have a quieter shutter mechanism like the recently released M (Typ 262).

The M-D (Typ 262) follows the limited-edition M Edition 60, which was the first Leica digital M camera to have no rear LCD screen. Like the M60, the M-D (Typ 262) has a beautifully finished metal ISO dial on the back of the camera in place of a display, putting all three exposure controls (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) right at your fingertips. A welcome addition not found on the M60 is a rear thumb dial to adjust exposure compensation. Unlike the M (Typ 262), the M-D is styled more like the M-P (Typ 240) with no red Leica dot and the classic white Leica script engraving on the top plate.

Leica-M-D-Typ-262-camera-3

Leica-M-D-Typ-262-camera-4

Since the announcement of the M Edition 60 at the last Photokina, many users requested a non-special edition M that would have a similar design philosophy, one that would reduce the camera down to the bare essentials of rangefinder photography. With the release of the M-D (Typ 262), Leica shooters looking for the pure M experience who still want the benefits of Leica’s latest digital technology now have their wish granted.

The camera is priced at $5,995. For full specifications or to place an order, you can check out the M-D at Leica Store Miami here: Leica M-D (Typ 262). First deliveries of the camera are expected in early May 2016.

The full press release, from Leica:

Reduced to the essentials both in features and design, the Leica M-D (Typ 262) embodies the essence of rangefinder photography. For features, it has setting options for ISO values, aperture and shutter speeds. Design wise, the camera excludes an LCD monitor, menu controls and Leica red dot logo. It features the classic step at the end of the top plate.

The images from the Leica M-D (Typ 262) are characterized by outstanding contrast, exceptional detail resolution and low image noise. It is ideal to shoot with available light.

The Leica M-D (Typ 262) features a shutter cocking system that is quieter than that of its sister models the M and M-P (Typ 240). In single exposure mode, the shutter release frequency is up to two frames per second. In continuous mode, the Leica M (Typ 262) has the same burst rate as its sister models and shoots up to three frames per second.

The discreteness and compact size of the camera allows photographers to not only get close to the action, but into the heart of where it’s happening.

Leica M-D_front   Leica M-D_top   emotional_Leica M-D_back   emotional_Leica M-D_front


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25 comments:

  1. Harry Mueller wrote:
    I wish it to be smaller!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are not alone. That might even have been possible, however, that also would have required a complete redesign which would have made the camera definitely more expensive.

      Delete
  2. Tadeáš Plachý wrote:
    I shoot film only, so I maybe not very qualified to comment on topic of digtal cameras, but digital without a display seems just plain stupid to me...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't agree. This camera allows to use a digital camera just like any of the film cameras but offers the ease of working digitally - no need to buy film no need to develop film no need to scan or print negatives. All else is the same.

      Delete
    2. Tadeáš Plachý replied:
      So instead of gathering strenght to stop chimping you will buy new camera?

      Delete
    3. Nobody is forcing anyone to buy a new camera, but for those that are interested in a film like operation of a digital camera, this is an option not offered by anyone else.

      Delete
  3. Matthew Fleming wrote:
    How do I calibrate the white balance? Or change from JPG to DNG? Or even change the internal clock?
    Rather than making things simpler, the M-D is adding layers of complexity that don't need to be there!
    Of course, no one is being forced into buying this, but I think the idea that the M-D is "film like" in operation is ludicrous.
    A good camera shouldn't get in the way of making a good photo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Considering that so far you haven't had the camera in your hands, your assessment of the camera getting in the way of a good photo is hasty at best. The functions you are looking for are set, in the viewfinder, by the thumbwheel in back of the camera and by the button to the right of the shutter release.

      Delete
  4. David Mateu wrote:
    Bonjour Mr Heinz Richter j'ai essayé un M6 et je voudrais acheté un numérique pouvez vous me conseillé ! je travaille le nu, portrait, reportage, et bien sur paysage et ville quand je me déplace !

    Hello, Mr. Heinz Richter I tried a m6 and i wish I bought a digital can you advise me! I'm working the nude, portrait, reportage, well on landscape and city when I'm moving!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your interests are very much like my own. I used to own a Leica M6 and have since changed to an M8. The M8 is serving me very well, as a matter of fact, I think the relatively modest resolution of 10 MP belies its performance. I have cropped images to 1/8 of the total sensor area with excellent results. However, I am planning to update in the near future to the Leica M (240), the reason being that I also like to use long lenses, up to 400mm, which I will be able to use on the M (240) with the electronic Visoflex.

      Delete
    2. David Mateu replied:
      Merci de vos conseils ! ils sont tès utiles sur la décision que je vais prendre, encore merci !

      Thank you for your advice! They are very useful on the decision that I'm going to take, thanks again!

      Delete
  5. Tadeáš Plachý wrote:
    Well, if I want "film like" experience with no display and buttons I have M3, M2, M4, M5, M6 and M7 to choose and for money saved I sure can buy some film and scanner...

    And thats what I did...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I said before, nopbody is forcing anyone to buy this camera.

      Delete
  6. Edward Chick wrote:
    Bit silly really

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe for you, but not for the many people that were looking for just that camera.

      Delete
  7. Edward Chick answered:
    But if they don't want to screen on the back, put some duct tape over it and save $2000. I have many Leicas - this one is irrational.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, the old argument of ignoring the screen. But you can't get away from having to use the screen since many of the important camera functions are only accessible that way. So duct tape is no answer. With the Leica M-D that is obviouslyy not the case. Nobody is forcing you to buy the camera, or even like it. But with the M-D Leica is offering a camera, as I said, that many have been waiting for.

      Delete
    2. Leica should be commended for offering such a variety of cameras. This way most people don't need to compromise .

      Delete
    3. Edward Chick wrote:
      They should be commended for making quality at the right price. Not playing games with collectors.

      Delete
    4. How are they playing games with collectors?

      Delete
    5. Edward Chick answered:
      Because a certain % are never used - only collected. At almost no development or production costs Leica can sell $500k worth of equipment. Fine but nothing to do with promoting camera excellence. Easy to prove: eBay, auction houses etc.

      Meanwhile MMs (I use both) and 240 are excellent (just over priced).

      Delete
    6. Again, that is your opinion to which you are definitely entitled. However, if someone sees a certain Leica model as an investment, I see nothing wrong with that. It definitely ads extra profit to the coffers of Leica. Nowhere is it written that Leica should only be owned to be used.

      Delete
    7. As far as Leicas being overpriced, that is definitely open to debate. Nobody questions the quality of Leica equipment, but hardly anyone gives any thought as to where that quality comes from. The simple fact is that mass production cannot attain the level of quality that Leica offers. That is only possible with the bench made production that Leica uses. That, unfortunately, is also quite a bit more expensive. Nobody can make a camera with the quality of a Leica for the price of a Fuji or Sony.

      Delete