Tuesday, September 22, 2020

NEW AUTOMATIC LENS REVERSER AND BELLOWS FOR LEICA L-MOUNT




Novoflex has shown two new products that are definitely of interest to Leica owners.  Products for close and macro photography have long been a specialty of Novoflex.  They have now expanded their product range with a reversing adapter for the Leica L-Mount (Leica, Panasonic, Sigma).

Most standard lenses, when used for macro photography will show a noticeable increase in performance when mounted to the camera in a reversed position.


These new reversing adapters allow magnification greater than with most macro lenses with fixed focal lengths as well as most zoom lenses.  The new adapters maintain all functions between camera and lens. They come with a standard 58 mm filter thread. For lenses with filter diameters from 37 mm to 82 mm, adapters are available.  A high-quality, multi-layered protection filter made by Heliopan to protect the sensitive lens rear lens is also available.

The ‘Umkehradapter’ is availabl;e for 349 euros.

Bellows have been part of Novoflex since 1969. Owners of a Leica SL and other L-mount cameras are now able to take advantage of a new automatic bellows.

Neue Automatik-Balgengeräte

All control information between camera and lens are maintained.  Even with standard camera lenses reproduction ratios of 1:1 and larger can be achieved.  In addition, Novoflex recommends the high-resolution, apochromatically corrected Apo Digitar 4.5 / 90 mm lens head from Schneider Kreuznach, which allows focusing from 1:1 to infinity.

The lenses can also be used in retro position on the bellows with the automatic reversing adapter offered by Novoflex.

The automatic bellows is799 euros. The FLEX-APO-DIGI 4,5 / 90 is available for € 1,099.



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Sunday, September 20, 2020

SOME GENERALLY UNKNOWN BITS OF INFO ON LEICA



Leica 75mm f/0.85


It has often been said that Leica missed the change to digital, that they got caught sitting on the laurels of their analog cameras.  Dr. Andreas Kaufmann has a different opinion on this.

He said that this rumor has been going on for years and he pointed out that Leica already established a digital department back in 1994 and two years later showed their first digital camera, the Leica S1. At the Photokina during that time they did not show their entire portfolio, but almost only analog cameras. Each employee wore a button with the inscription: 'I am a www.filmdinosaurier.de'.  Just that year, digital photography had its big breakthrough and Leica, from the small village in the middle of Germany, showed only analogue cameras. Since that time, the myth of sleepy digitization stubbornly persists.

Leica S1 from 1996 with the at that time unusually high resolution of 26 megapixel

Does he consider smart phones to be a competitive segment of photography?

Not at all. He looks at them as a supplement. They work closely with Huawei. The four lenses in the current Huawei phones are just the beginning. They still have big plans with mobile phone photography.

Huawei four lens model Mate 30 Pro

He is looking forward to have as many as six camera systems in the phone. The so-called array system. One lens is responsible for the depth of field, the other only photographs red and so on. Together they give the quality of a big, powerful lens. The problem is that the processor is still missing, as well as the necessary algorithms. Nobody can do that yet. For example, their goal is to utilize the array system in a smartphone. They are working on that.

Dr. Kaufmann rejects the often heard claim that Leica is a luxury item, based on the cost.

The term luxury has something to do with abundance in Germany. However, Leica does not call themselves the superfluous but the essential. Their prices may seem luxurious, but there are several reasons for this: how they produce their lenses, how they make only small batches and how they use materials differently. Of course, for many it is a luxury item when they look at the price.

For more information about what Leica does differently from any other manufacturer go to "Making Cameras ans Lenses the Leica Way"

He was asked if it is correct that he often buys his Leica equipment at actual stores instead of getting it free at the company in Wetzlar.

Sometimes he gets some to try. But he bought about 60 percent of his 35 cameras himself. That is often very exciting. Not everyone knows him. On these occasions he is testing the service of a store right away. He does that often in the US, and in Europe. He has had the worst experiences at some of the large camera stores in New York. B & H is the largest camera dealer in the world. Whenever he asked to buy a Leica there, the sales person advised him that Leicas are too expensive, with the suggestion to buy a Canon because they are cheaper. That showed him that Leica is probably not in the right place with such stores anymore.

On the question if he had any ambition to do something entirely different, he answered that currently nothing is more fun than this job. Should he find something that he’ll enjoy even more, maybe. However, he is firmly convinced that it will remain a lot of fun for another ten or twenty years.

Leica is obviously on the right track with new camera just around the corner.  I for one hope the Dr. Kaufmann's fun will continue for a long time.


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Friday, September 18, 2020

MY PERSONAL LEICA EQUIPMENT





By Heinz Richter

I am asked quite often what camera equipment I use.  The simple answer is: Leica.  As I have mentioned before, my first Leica was a Leica III with 50mm f/2 Summar that my father gave me for my 5th birthday.  I still have that camera.  It works as well as it did on day one.

My first Leica, a Leica III with 50mm f/2 Summar

Of course I have used other equipment in the past as well.  In the film days it was expected that one used more than just 35mm equipment, so I also had two Rolleiflex SL 66 cameras for medium format and a Plaubel Peco Universal for large format work.

But at no time was I ever without a Leica for 35mm work.  Via Leica IIIC , a IIIf and a Leica IIIG I graduated to two Leica M3 cameras with a compliment of lenses.  They were rather unique in as much that the one body was of the first serial number batch ever made.  The second body was the exact opposite; it was of one of the last serial number batches ever made of the M3.  Those two rangefinder cameras were accompanied by a Leica R3 and later R4 at one time or another. Unfortunately, those two M3 cameras as well as all the lenses were stolen.

I replaced them with the same lenses and a Leica M6 camera.  That system served me well until it was time to change over to digital.  My first digital Leica was a Digilux 2 which soon after was accompanied by a Digilux 3.  But I still hung onto the M6 and its lenses.

My first digital Leica, a Digilux 2.
I replaced the original black cover of the camera with grey
leather.  The camera is still in frequent use by myself as wll
as my wife.

As soon as it became available, I added a Leica M8 to my system.  It served me well until I replaced it with my current Leica M240.  

People have asked me why I didn’t stay with the M8 or why I didn’t switch to a M9.  The main reason is live view.  In order to use lenses longer than 135mm live view is necessary unless you want to bother with the old Visoflex II or III.  The ease of use of longer lenses and close-up photography are made a lot easier with the electronic Visoflex, the electronic viewfinder which cannot be had with either the M8 or the M9.  I also like the higher resolution of the M240, not that I make very big enlargements on a regular basis.  But the higher resolution enables me to crop when there was not enough time to switch to a longer lens or a lens that allows me to focus closer.

Full Frame

Cropped section of the same frame

Very small cropped section of the same frame

My current working system consists mainly of the camera, a 28mm f/2.8 Elmarit, a 50mm f/2 Summicron and a 90mm f/2.8 Elmarit.  To facilitate easier changing of lenses I am planning to modify my cameras case with a removable insert offering three rigidly attached Leica rear caps.  With one lens installed on the camera, two of the rear caps will hold two additional lenses.  When changing lenses, the lens off the camera will be attached to the open rear cap in the camera case, freeing my hands to easily attach another lens.


I have always been a firm believer in being prepared for even unusual shooting situations.  For that reason I also have a 135mm f/2.8 Elmarit as the longest lens that can be used with the Leica rangefinder and a 15mm f/4.5 Voigtlnder Super Wide-Heliar.

I have often been asked why I bother with the 135mm.  I mainly use it for portrait and portrait related work.  In many cases, individuals that are not used to being in front of a camera have a tendency to tense up when a camera is pointed at them.  The 135mm Elmarit allows for a greater shooting distance which in most cases will put the client more at ease.  That has gained additional importance because of Covid 19.  I still do occasional shoots, mostly with models.  Here too the additional shooting distance allowed by the 135mm 
Elmarit allows me to shoot with social distancing. The 135mm Elmarit has the additional advantage of utilizing the 90mm viewfinder frame which is magnified by the viewfinder magnifier built into the lens, the so called goggles, to the field of view of the 135mm.  This greatly increases the rangefinder accuracy.  

I am a firm believer that if at all possible, one should use Leica lenses on a Leica camera.  Otherwise the performance potential of the camera is compromised.  So why chose the 15mm Voigtländer?  15 mm is a focal length that I use quite rarely. Therefore I felt that a Leica lens was beyond a sensible expenditure.  The Voigtläder 15mm was a reasonable substitute. 

I have always been interested in long lenses for a variety of work, including wildlife and nature photography.  For that type of photography I use a 200mm f/3.8 and a 400mm f/5.6 Novoflex Follow Focus lens.  They are of the same design as the 400/560mm and the 800mm Leitz Telyt lenses and have proven to be of virtually the same performance level.  But the pistol grip type focusing makes their use substantially easier and faster.  With the electronic viewfinder on the Leica M240 they have proven to be very capable lenses, as are a 55mm f/3.5 and a 105mm f/4 Micro-Nikkor for close-up work.


In the future I am planning to replace one of the Micro-Nikkor lenses with a Leica-R macro lens and there is a Leica M10 lurking somewhere in the future.

But for the time being I am quite satisfied with what I have.  As it is always the case, it is not so much the equipment, rather than the photographer behind the camera.

 


I use an older Leitz camera bag.  It holds the camera with the 28mm or 50mm lens attached.
Rear to rear lens couplers allow me to carry two of the short lenses in one compartment,
next to the 90mm and the 135mm, including the electronic Visoflex

Leica M240 with Novoflex 200mm f/3.8

Leica M240 with Novoflex 400mm f/5.6



For other articles on this blog please click on Blog Archive in the column to the right

To comment or to read comments please scroll past the ads below.

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_______________________________________________________________________

Woman wears brown elk-leather camera strap around her shoulders.
      www.eddycam.com        

      


Buy vintage Leica cameras from 
America's premier Leica specialist 

 http://www.tamarkin.com/leicagallery/upcoming-show



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